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this didn’t make it into a piece i worked on, but wanted to post it here because i still really like it:

You climb to the top of the mountain you’ve been climbing forever, only to find that not only are there other mountains, but that some are higher than the one you’ve just conquered. Maybe the ending of Bioshock Infinite was some reflexive reference to this, Levine’s own personal visualization of the infinite permutations of his current development trajectory: In that space all possible variations of Bioshock can and do exist, and faced with this existential worry, Levine seeks alternatives, seeks solutions in fundamental building blocks that may alleviate his own worry that what he’s been making is more or less the same game.

dear god yes. 

dear god yes. 

sekigan:

jun さんの Mech ボードのピン | Pinterest
ruby james
Pics and It Didn’t Happen

coming to this a bit late, but it proved a good starting point to a journey into articles about the fetishism of the “offline” and counterarguments against the construction itself.

the artist isn’t present
the portrayal of kubrick through images have always amazed me, mainly that he seemed (unless disarmed in moments of clever enjoyment) to be part of his art, his visage meshing nicely with the gravitas his work is supposed to command. the idea of kubrick being “a singular figure" a construction that likely evolved with his cinema (as all filmmakers must be "discovered"), who kubrick was seemed to have mostly faded, and we now view him as an inseparable part of his own creations. this also makes him an easy target for aspiring directors, with tales of his cinematic vigilance rarely decoupled from his films — every tale of a film is accompanied by a “did you know…” line. his baggy eyes and frequently disheveled hair leads to the idea of the “tortured artist” type, one who is constantly engaged, if not part of, his work. to “like kubrick” is rarely to like just his films, it is, even at the most amateur level, to like both the productions and the man who made them, the latter also being a construction. whether or not there is a “real kubrick,” one separated from his work, we do not know, as the only one to have survived, even in the short period since his death, is either artifice or the total realization of artist being one with their art.

the artist isn’t present

the portrayal of kubrick through images have always amazed me, mainly that he seemed (unless disarmed in moments of clever enjoyment) to be part of his art, his visage meshing nicely with the gravitas his work is supposed to command. the idea of kubrick being “a singular figure" a construction that likely evolved with his cinema (as all filmmakers must be "discovered"), who kubrick was seemed to have mostly faded, and we now view him as an inseparable part of his own creations. this also makes him an easy target for aspiring directors, with tales of his cinematic vigilance rarely decoupled from his films — every tale of a film is accompanied by a “did you know…” line. his baggy eyes and frequently disheveled hair leads to the idea of the “tortured artist” type, one who is constantly engaged, if not part of, his work. to “like kubrick” is rarely to like just his films, it is, even at the most amateur level, to like both the productions and the man who made them, the latter also being a construction. whether or not there is a “real kubrick,” one separated from his work, we do not know, as the only one to have survived, even in the short period since his death, is either artifice or the total realization of artist being one with their art.

"As far as the artists know, this is the first device of this kind being made at this particular scale: their video objects can be made nearly 12 inches in size. ‘When you actually stand there with them floating in front of you, they have a life that you connect to in a very different way than you would with a film or video, or even a 3D film,’ says Helson."

These are the kind of quotes we will look back on in 10 years and laugh at.

captiviating

There is no law that dictates that just because an artist does a good thing once that they can make a career out of it. Think of all the bands with one good album and a career full of shitty ones that only exists because the culture industry suggests that if you can do one artistic thing successfully once, you can keep doing it.”

x

And the award for best cinematography in a Kickstarter video goes to: Bibliotheca

Seriously though. The project itself is a great idea and I think his execution is completely on point, but goodhonest should win an award. I was just recently at Kickstarter’s film festival in Brooklyn, and of all the films they showed, less than five actually looked good. This is just a pitch video and these guys knock it out of the park. Bravo.

 
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